Addis ethio social dating

26-Nov-2015 02:30

One day they arrested me and they showed me everything.They showed me a list of all my phone calls and they played a conversation I had with my brother.

It was the first phone I ever owned, and I thought I could finally talk freely.Since 2010, Ethiopia’s information technology capabilities have grown by leaps and bounds.Although Ethiopia still lags well behind many other countries in Africa, mobile phone coverage is increasing and access to email and social media have opened up opportunities for young Ethiopians—especially those living in urban areas—to communicate with each other and share viewpoints and ideas.The Ethiopian government should consider the spread of Internet and other communications technology an important opportunity.Encouraging the growth of the telecommunications sector is crucial for the country to modernize and achieve its ambitious economic growth targets.As a result, the increasing technological ability of Ethiopians to communicate, express their views, and organize is viewed less as a social benefit and more as a political threat for the ruling party, which depends upon invasive monitoring and surveillance to maintain control of its population.

The Ethiopian government has maintained strict control over Internet and mobile technologies so it can monitor their use and limit the type of information that is being communicated and accessed.

Unlike most other African countries, Ethiopia has a complete monopoly over its rapidly growing telecommunications sector through the state-owned operator, Ethio Telecom.

Instead, the ruling Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF), a coalition of ethnically-based political parties in power for more than 20 years, continues to severely restrict the rights to freedom of expression, association, and peaceful assembly.

It has used repressive laws to decimate civil society organizations and independent media and target individuals with politically-motivated prosecutions.

ongoing but limited insurgency by the Oromo Liberation Front (OLF) in the Oromia region to justify widespread repression of the ethnic Oromo population.

Associations with other banned groups, including Ginbot 7, are also used to justify repression.