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14-Nov-2015 02:34

“With a kidney transplant, Daniel should be able to live a normal life.He’ll be on medication for the rest of his life but it can be absolutely life-changing.

He had his first operation at seven days old and at 10 months in June he had to have one of his kidneys removed and started daily dialysis.He’s hooked up to machines for 10 hours during the night as he goes through 13 different cycles of fluids running through his system to flush out toxins.Louise says she and Nick would happily donate a kidney to bring an end to Daniel's suffering.She added: “You’d go to the end of the earth for your child. We automatically put ourselves forward – you don’t even think about it.With his wide smile and big brown eyes, little Daniel Cornet looks perfectly healthy – but the brave tot is battling serious kidney disease and will need a transplant.His parents Louise Paton and Nick Cornet have put themselves forward for tests to see if they can donate a kidney when their little boy is old enough to have the op.

But until he weighs at least 15 kilos – which won't happen until he is aged about three – Daniel, now 17 months, will be on daily kidney dialysis.

The youngster has never eaten proper food and has already had 11 operations, reports the Daily Record.

But he has coped so well that Louise, who lives in Dunfermline, decided to set up a Facebook page charting his progress. He refuses to let his condition stop him enjoying life and Louise, 36 and chef Nick, 38, are determined to stay just as positive.

Louise said: “He looks so well all the time – it’s so deceiving.

When you’re out and about he looks perfect but he’s really ill underneath it all.” Daniel was born with stage 5 kidney failure due to the condition posterior urethral valve (PUV), which is thought to develop in the early stages of foetal development.

It only affects boys and occurs in about one in every 5000 to 8000 births.